Review: Inherited Disorders

cover81317-medium.pngNote: A review copy of Inherited Disorders was provided to me free of charge by the publisher through the NetGalley system for an unbiased review.

Adam Sachs’ Inherited Disorders is build around a very simple idea–father and son relationships. The idea is simple, but the reality is anything but clear-cut.

In over one hundred different ways, Sachs examines the ways in which fathers and sons relate to one another–in terms of personality, genetics, and the idea of an “inheritance.” Some argue over their physical inheritance of wealth. Some struggle with legacy, either to carry it on or to ultimately fulfill it. In one instance, a father literally removes his skin for his son to wear.

Hilarious and undeniably original, Adam Sachs circles around the idea of father-son relationships again and again. Inherited Disorders was a quick and enjoyable read, but it can get a little repetitive. Of course, this is somewhat the point. In each story, I was looking forward to the twist that Sachs would put on the story. In my opinion, the most memorable instance occurs when a son talks to his father’s frozen head while asking a friend to read a screenplay that his father never approved of.

Sachs looks at the father-son dynamic in interesting ways, but I can’t help feel that I can relate to Inherited Disorders as a male reader. I would be interested to see how a female reader responds to the text. In some ways, mother-daughter relationships are no different, undeniably, but in terms of more “classic” expectations of what we can likely admit is a patriarchal society, these relationships can be quite different.

Needless to say, as a fan of unconventional literature, I’m looking forward to Sachs’ future work.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Review: Inherited Disorders

    1. I think it’s one of those books that is better broken up between reads, you know? Read 4 or 5…chuckle…grimace…think it’s brutal. Read something else…read 4 or 5…react… I feel like reading it in series didn’t work as well as I thought it would.

      I’d definitely be curious to hear what you think of it if/when you get to it.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s