Thrifty Thursday (1/28)

thrifty thursday

(Graphic made by Julianne @ Outlandish Lit)

 

Hello everyone, and welcome back to Thrifty Thursdays!

The rules are simple and are as follows:

1. Each week’s link-up will be posted on Thursday.

2. Post or talk about a book you found used (preferably in a book store or thrift shop).

3. The book must cost less than $5.

4. Return for the link-up!

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Ideally, we all would be exploring authors, books, and genres that we never would have considered otherwise. Some of us may find new favorites. Others may just find some laughs. Either way, we’d be supporting independent booksellers who are the backbone of what we do as bloggers. Of course, these books cost money, and posting each week isn’t required, though you’re certainly welcome to do so.

My pick for this week?

At Night We Walk in Circles coverAt Night We Walk In Circles by Daniel Alarcón

Cost: $3.99

Total saved thus far compared to new prices: $75.00

Where did I get it? Yes…I know..eBay again. Well, in my defense, the snow has made it difficult to get around, but I’m still trying to keep some independent booksellers going. Free State Books, an eBay seller with over 300,000 titles for sale, provided me with this week’s pick at a great price.

Daniel Alarcón’s books have been high on my to-read list since I had first read some of his short stories in a creative writing class way back in 2010, but I just haven’t gotten to some of them. The first full-length novel of his that I had read, Lost City Radio, was enjoyable albeit not a favorite, but we’ll see how At Night We Walk In Circles pans out. I know this one isn’t very weird, but we will try to get back to that next week.

Alarcón is a writer who really draws on his South American culture. Lost City Radio was a title that, I believe, drew from the idea of Los Desaparecidos, the practice of forced disappearance at the hands of different South American governments that took many from their families. In Lost City Radio, the novel is built around a radio station in a fiction South American locale that tries to reunite the disappeared with their families (if they survived at all) in a world in which the government has removed all traces of indigenous language and has replaced all town, village, and city names with numbers.

In any case, At Night We Walk in Circles is a little different. Per the Amazon description:

 

Nelson’s life is not turning out the way he hoped. His girlfriend is sleeping with another man, his brother has left their South American country, leaving Nelson to care for their widowed mother, and his acting career can’t seem to get off the ground. That is, until he lands a starring role in a touring revival of The Idiot President, a legendary play by Nelson’s hero, Henry Nunez, leader of the storied guerrilla theater troupe Diciembre. And that’s when the real trouble begins.

The tour takes Nelson out of the shelter of the city and across a landscape he’s never seen, which still bears the scars of the civil war. With each performance, Nelson grows closer to his fellow actors, becoming hopelessly entangled in their complicated lives, until, during one memorable performance, a long-buried betrayal surfaces to force the troupe into chaos.

Nelson’s fate is slowly revealed through the investigation of the narrator, a young man obsessed with Nelson’s story—and perhaps closer to it than he lets on. In sharp, vivid, and beautiful prose, Alarcón delivers a compulsively readable narrative and a provocative meditation on fate, identity, and the large consequences that can result from even our smallest choices.

We’ll see how this one turns out. It definitely sounds ambitious.

 

What have you picked up on the cheap lately?

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