Thrifty Thursday (Nov. 19)

Thrifty Thursday1

NOTE: I’m a day early, I know. I was hoping to post a bit early to give everyone a little time to get a post together and/or grab a book.

Hello everyone, and welcome back to Thrifty Thursdays!

The rules are simple and are as follows:

1. Each week’s link-up will be posted on Thursday.

2. Post or talk about a book you found used (preferably in a book store or thrift shop).

3. The book must cost less than $5.

4. Be sure to return for the link-up! Weird or strange books are preferred.

Ideally, we all would be exploring authors, books, and genres that we never would have considered otherwise. Some of us may find new favorites. Others may just find some laughs. Either way, we’d be supporting independent booksellers who are the backbone of what we do as bloggers. Of course, these books cost money, and posting each week isn’t required, though you’re certainly welcome to do so. An interesting possibility down the line may be picking a subject or genre and trying to find the oddest possible title.

 

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My pick for this week?

Layout 1A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing by Eimear McBride

Cost: $5.42 (Close enough!)

Total saved thus far compared to new prices: $48.

Where did I get it? Big River Books, an eBay seller of used books at very affordable prices. Since I’ve been working, I haven’t had as much time as I’d like to visit stores in the city. I still enjoy helping smaller businesses, especially those that are involved in keeping books circulating and not entering a landfill (a thought that horrifies me). Big River Books’ prices are very affordable, and their shipping is very quick. I definitely recommend them.

 

Anyway, let’s talk about the book! I happened to find this one on a list of Experimental Novels That Everyone Should Read, and in addition to the interesting description, I also like the minimalist, yet strange, artwork. I might read a small description, but I never like to delve too far into any purchase because it can defeat the purpose of Thrifty Thursday which is not only to give used books another home, but also to explore things outside of your comfort zone.

Here’s the description provided by Flavorwire on their aforementioned list that made me interested in reading.

McBride’s widely lauded novel is full of fragmented, floating sentences that sometimes feel like only gestures at sentences, like gestures at the things under thoughts, that real, pre-language stuff. It’s hard going at first, but once you let the language wash over you and form a rhythm, the book blossoms into a gorgeous, brutal stream of word and thought.

Does it have things that interest me?

  • Fragmentation. Check.
  • Hard going. Check.
  • Things I can’t easily list in this fashion. Check.

The idea of of the novel offering “gestures at the things under thoughts, that real, pre-language stuff” is the phrase that really makes this novel sound intriguing. I often read bits of information about psychology, philosophy, or neurology, and how the brain creates language and meaning is something that I find ridiculously fascinating. The idea of a novel trying to get at some of these ideas is a pretty ambitious endeavor. Keep an eye out for the review.

Here’s the Amazon description which I haven’t read because I want to know nothing further going in.

In scathing, furious, unforgettable prose, Eimear McBride tells the story of a young girl’s devastating adolescence as she and her brother, who suffers from a brain tumor, struggle for a semblance of normalcy in the shadow of sexual abuse, denial, and chaos at home. Plunging readers inside the psyche of a girl isolated by her own dangerously confusing sexuality, pervading guilt, and unrelenting trauma, McBride’s writing carries echoes of Joyce, O’Brien, and Woolf.  A Girl is a Half-formed Thing is a revelatory work of fiction, a novel that instantly takes its place in the canon.

What have you picked up this week? Am I going to like A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing?

As always, best wishes.

-S

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